Monthly archives "October"

3 Articles
Little Miss Inventor

WE’RE CELEBRATING ALL LITTLE INVENTORS AROUND THE UK! Win a set of Little Miss Inventor nametags by sharing your inventions with us!

This year, we’re celebrating the launch of our new Little Miss Inventor name labels and National Inventors Day on 9th November by giving 10 lucky people the chance to win a set of Little Miss Inventor nametags.

 

Who is Little Miss Inventor?lmi

The new character recently joined the popular Mr. Men series and has already gone down a storm with children and parents alike. Little Miss Inventor, a female engineer, has been created as a positive role model for girls, according to author and illustrator, Adam Hargreaves.

She will be the 36th Little Miss character and joins the likes of Little Miss Sunshine and Little Miss Magic. The character, with pencils and a spanner in her hair, is described as “intelligent, ingenious, and inventive”.

 

 

plane

How to enter

We want you to take a picture of your ‘little inventors’ and their creations, or just their creations! This can be anything from a piece of artwork or a spaceship made from an old washing up liquid bottle, to an aeroplane made from cardboard boxes – anything they’ve created!

Just be sure to share it to one of your social media channels (Facebook, Instagram or Twitter) and include the hashtag #MyNametagsInventor.

The competition is open from Friday October 26th 2018 until Friday November 9th 2018 and all competition entries will be available to see in a gallery on the My Nametags website. From the entries, 10 winners will be announced on 12th November 2018.

We can’t wait to see all the clever and wonderful things you’ve been creating! Good Luck!

 

 

The ‘Little Inventors’ Gallery

Welcome to the gallery of ‘Little Inventors’! We love all the wonderful and clever inventions entered in to win our Inventors Day prize so far…

 

Please click here for full terms and conditions.

Lost and found: more than €10,000 are lost in one year at one school alone!

 

A small investigative exercise to try and quantify the cost of not labelling school items was carried out over the summer months. The exercise, carried out by a local Maltese PR company on our behalf, revealed numbers that were pretty shocking.

At the end of the last scholastic year, a small investigative exercise into the contents of the lost and found boxes at a number of schools and nurseries on the island year was undertaken. The sheer volume at the sample of the island’s schools was impressive.

Findings showed that the main culprits at nurseries and day-cares were unsurprisingly dummies, comforters, socks and bottle tops. In Kindergartens and Primary Schools you start to find a few more lunchboxes, water bottles, stationery, and some uniform items like tracksuit bottoms.  At an average cost of Eur29.00 per piece, the numbers started to add up.

At Secondary School the numbers shot go through the roof! Not only in terms of volume but if you had to quantify the cost of the items, the numbers were pretty impressive! One school alone had over 130 blazers and tracksuit jackets, over 100 sweaters and tracksuit bottoms, over 80 shirts and t-shirts, 40 water bottles and a large number of miscellaneous items like hairbands and school books, all without names or labels.  With 100 sweaters at approximately Eur35.00 per piece, 130 blazers at an average cost of Eur57.50 (the cost of a blazer can actually go up to about Eur70.00) that’s Eur10,000+ at one school alone!

The majority of the schools we spoke to reported that if the brothers/sisters name is on the item, they mostly manage to give it back, but the huge amount of items that never have a label is impressive.

feedback-2849602_1920 (002)-1

GREAT EXPECTATIONS: OUR RESEARCH REVEALS THE UNFAIR STEREOTYPES BRITS MAKE BASED ON FIRST NAMES

We know that a person’s name can really paint a picture of the type of person that they are, so we were interested to find out what stereotypes exist around the UK’s most popular names and whether they ring true when put to the test.

THE STEREOTYPES

Focussing on six of the most common names in the UK: David, James, Christopher, Sarah, Laura and Gemma, we conducted a survey of 2,000 adults to determine the stereotypes surrounding each of the names.

Key findings

  • People named James are considered to be the most charismatic
  • We expect people called Gemma to be bad tempered and unkind
  • Davids are expected to be assertive, angry and closed-minded
  • Sarahs are thought to be likeable, conscientious and kind
  • Christophers are considered to be intellectual, reliable, quiet and high-achieving
  • Lauras are often thought to be unlikable and bad team players

What the experts say

Chartered Clinical Psychologist and Scientist, Linda Blair explains why these stereotypes exist: “One of the ways we deal with information overload, a real problem in today’s world, is to create mental ‘shortcuts’ and relying on name stereotypes is one of them. However, these stereotypes are usually based on only a few high-profile individuals at a particular point in time and, even less realistically, often on fictional characters in books and films. As a result, they rarely hold up in everyday encounters. Add this to the fact that each of us displays different, often contradictory qualities, depending on the situation, and you’ll find those stereotypes bear little relation to the people you meet.”

TESTING THE STEREOTYPES

Keen to test this theory, we teamed up with Linda Blair to conduct a series of psychological assessments devised to reveal an individual’s most dominant personality traits, on a test group of people with these six names. Using ‘The Big Five’ personality types, which are the five categories used by psychologists to define human personalities, the trial asked each of the subjects to describe themselves from their own point of view, as well as their friends and family’s point of view, to give a rounded perspective of their personalities.

The results showed that in many instances, the stereotypes were entirely wrong.  Surprisingly, given how strong the stereotypes are, only around 30 percent of people tested displayed the characteristics that we expected them to have.

What this means

Commenting on the findings, Linda Blair said: “The tests revealed that most people have a range of conflicting personality traits, offering a potential explanation as to why so few people lived up to their stereotypes. For instance, during testing, one Sarah described herself and both organised and disorganised, depending on the situation. This makes it incredibly difficult to categorise individuals into a broad stereotype, especially based on their first name alone.

“These contrasting qualities are likely to present themselves to different people in different situations, so there is no single list of qualities that could be used to describe any one of these accurately. For this reason, I would suggest that it isn’t possible for someone to ‘act like a James’ and we shouldn’t be tempted to make judgements about people based purely on their name because we will almost certainly be wrong.”

 

What are your thoughts? We’d love to hear from you! Tweet us @MyNametags or join the conversation on our Facebook page.